©2019 by The King’s Counterpoint

The King's Counterpoint is thrilled and honored to have been invited

to return to Canterbury Cathedral in 2021 for a one-week Choral Residency 

A Choral Residency is a wonderful opportunity, but also an important responsibility: The King’s Counterpoint

will be singing daily Choral Evensong services, Sunday Eucharist and Choral Matins while at Canterbury. It's an incredible amount of great music, sung for congregations of both local residents and international Cathedral visitors!

The King's Counterpoint is also thrilled to have the opportunity to present a concert at Buckfast Abbey on the Saturday prior to our Residency, where we will be joined by our very special guests - members of the Counterpoint 'family' of choirs! "Celestial Counterpoint" will feature members of KCP, along with vocalists from Counterpoint (Devon, UK), Contrapunctus Early Music (Cleveland, OH), and of course Cantores Charleston. And we couldn't be more excited about this incredible event!

We hope you’ll consider making a tax-deductible donation to help The King’s Counterpoint vocalists make this incredible trip. Please use the button below or scroll up to the Menu above to navigate to our "Support" page, where you will find links to make online donations, a printable Sponsor/Donor form, and the contact phone number if you'd like to speak to David or Judith directly about your donation or find out more about the Residency. ANY amount helps, and as always, we sincerely appreciate your continued support.

(The King's Counterpoint is a Registered 501(c)3 Non-Profit Organization)

About Canterbury Cathedral

St. Augustine, the first Archbishop of Canterbury, traveled from Rome and arrived on the coast of Kent

as a missionary to England in 597AD, sent by Pope Gregory the Great. The Cathedral is often described

as ‘England in stone’ as its history is intrinsically

linked to the country’s history. From Augustine, who established Christianity in England, to Archbishop Langton’s role in the Magna Carta negotiations and

the power struggle between King Henry II and Archbishop Thomas Becket, Canterbury Cathedral’s history is as rich as it comes.

About Buckfast Abbey

Buckfast Abbey forms part of an active Benedictine monastery at Buckfast, near Buckfastleigh, Devon, England, which first became home to an abbey in 1018. The first Benedictine abbey was followed by a Savignac abbey, constructed on the site of the current abbey in 1134. In medieval times the abbey became rich through fishing and trading in sheep wool, and by the 14th century Buckfast was one of the wealthiest abbeys in the south-west of England. The monastery was surrendered during King Henry VIII's Dissolution of Monasteries in 1539, with the monastic buildings stripped and left as ruins, before being finally demolished.

 

In 1882 the site was purchased by a group of French Benedictine monks, who refounded a monastery on the site, dedicated to Saint Mary. Today, The Abbey is a self-supporting and active Benedictine community.